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Advice for Students

In this section of the Say Yes Video Guide, our partner college admission deans and master counselors walk students through each step in the process — beginning with the question of “Why go to College?” through the application itself, as well as some tips on making the transition from high school to college. Our counselors have also prepared a series of worksheets that can be downloaded and provide further guidance. Scroll down to see our videos.

Getting Started

Why Go To College?

Say Yes' partner deans explain how attending and graduating from college can impact one's life.

Getting Started

Say Yes’ partner deans explain how attending and graduating from college can impact one’s life.

So how do you get started? Say Yes’ partner deans have some ideas for you.

Advice on starting the college process from master counselors Marie Bigham and Rafael Figueroa.

Some of Say Yes’ partner deans were first in their families to go to college, and they have advice.

Advice for first-gen applicants from master counselors Marie Bigham and Rafael Figueroa.

What does it mean for an applicant to “demonstrate interest”? Say Yes’ master counselors weigh in.

The Application

Engagement, leadership, commitment: what deans of admission prize in a student’s outside activities.

Say Yes’ partner deans explain how they use teacher and counselor recommendations.

Say Yes’ partner college deans explain the role of the admissions interview.

What do college admissions deans look for when they size up an application? We asked, they answered.

Say Yes’ master counselors provide their perspective on the college application process.

Tips from Say Yes’ college deans on using a college application essay to help them get to know you.

Financial Aid

Terms you need to know: the Fafsa; the CSS Profile; Net Price Calculator; Need-based and merit aid.

“Don’t let the sticker price scare you” and other tips on aid from Say Yes’ partner deans.

Making the Transition

Before they were admissions officers, our deans were students who made the transition to college.